(DOC) GCSE CHEMISTRY RATES OF REACTION COURSEWORK | Anjelina Qureshi - basqupiats.gq

 

gcse chemistry coursework

GCSE Chemistry is part of our science suite, developed with teachers to inspire and challenge students of all abilities and aspirations. The content starts with fundamental aspects of chemistry such as atomic structure, bonding and the properties of matter, and builds to topics in which the fundamentals are applied such as quantitative chemistry and equilibria. Enthalpy 2|Page Anjelina Qureshi Mrs Gravell Rates of Reaction Coursework Chemistry Year 11 Enthalpy, in chemistry, is the heat content in a chemical reaction. The enthalpy change is the amount of heat absorbed or released when a chemical reaction occurs at a constant pressure. Chemistry is about everything you've ever touched, eaten, drunk or breathed; every gas, liquid and solid in the universe. It gives you the opportunity to understand the chemical properties of the building blocks of life and the universe. Amongst other things you'll be studying the periodic table, reactions, carbon compounds, atoms and basqupiats.gqs:


Edexcel GCSE Sciences () | Pearson qualifications


To browse Academia. Skip to main content. You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. Log In Sign Up, gcse chemistry coursework. Gcse chemistry coursework Qureshi. These reactions only happen if the reacting molecules collide properly. The rate of reaction is the speed of a reaction. When the solution is made more concentrated, there are a greater number of molecules in the same space.

This increases the likelihood of reactants colliding properly and so increases the rate of the chemical reaction. Aim My aim is to investigate how changing the concentration of reactants can change the rate of reaction between hydrochloric acid and sodium thiosulphate. Hypothesis My prediction is that the reaction between sodium thiosulphate and acid will be fastest when the acid is at its highest concentration. This is because there will be more acid molecules in the same amount of solution, gcse chemistry coursework, therefore more effective collisions with the sodium thiosulphate, and the rate will be higher.

This is because when there are more molecules in the solution, there are more molecules to collide so this will speed up the reaction, gcse chemistry coursework, and therefore it is more likely they will collide with each other. This causes a quicker reaction. Background Research Chemical reactions are to do with changing the materials that form the base of your experiment.

Sodium thiosulphate is a colourless, crystal like compound and is used for dyes and is also a salt. Hydrochloric acid is colourless, poisonous and highly acidic. It is often used as a chemical intermediate and in petroleum production, food processing, pickling, gcse chemistry coursework, and metal cleaning.

It can also be found in the stomach. These chemicals are perfect for my investigation because they are both clear and colourless. This is good because I will instantly be able to see any change in the solution.

The state gcse chemistry coursework for sulphur gcse chemistry coursework is aq not g because it is dissolved in water as its original state would be too toxic and corrosive for me to use safely. I am investigating the different factors which may speed up chemical reactions. Rates of reaction vary depending on which chemicals are being used and the activation energy required.

Reactions that occur slowly have a low rate of reaction. Reactions that happen quickly have a high rate of reaction. For example, rusting is a slow reaction; it has a low rate of reaction. Burning and explosions are very fast reactions: they have a high rate of reaction. Activation energy Activation energy is the energy required to break the bonds of the reactants, gcse chemistry coursework, so that new bonds can form to make the products.

An input of heat energy is required to start some reactions. This energy gives the reactant particles enough energy to collide with enough force to break apart the bonds so that new products can be made from atoms. The enthalpy change is the amount of heat absorbed or released when a chemical reaction occurs at a constant pressure.

I decided that it would be best for me to gcse chemistry coursework a bold marker pen to make the mark more visible under the conical flask. This ensures that the solution is completely opaque when I stop the timer. The conical flask and all other equipment must be clean as any impurities may contaminate my experiment. Also, it has a gcse chemistry coursework top and so it is safer.

Using white paper helped the marking to stand out. I used this to gauge when to stop the reaction — when the black x was obscured by the white sulphur precipitate, the timer was stopped. I tied my hair back, tucked in my tie and pushed all stools and bags under the desk where there is no risk of anyone gcse chemistry coursework. I had to make sure that my classmates were safe as well as myself.

I made sure that I had everything before I started, gcse chemistry coursework. This makes sure that my experiment runs smoothly.

I also gcse chemistry coursework sure gcse chemistry coursework the measuring cylinder was on a level surface so that I could clearly see how much liquid I was putting in to it. As soon as the chemicals were in, I started the timer. I did not swirl these together because I wanted to see the rate of reaction without any intervention. The timer was stopped when in see the black cross through the cloudy solution could no longer. I wrote down my results and then moved on to the next concentration of gcse chemistry coursework thiosulphate.

This is very important because loose hair can not only gcse chemistry coursework dipped into chemicals but can also obscure vision, gcse chemistry coursework. I also made sure that any clothing or long jewellery was clear and out of our way as clothing can also get caught.

I tucked in my tie and shirt, and took off my blazer. I stood up to allow more space for others to walk by between the rooms. Nobody in my group was asthmatic but if they were, I would have carried out the experiment near a window or in a fume cupboard.

Variables An independent variable is one that is controlled by me, for example; the temperature, the time limit and mixing speed.

Dependent variables are not controlled by the experimenter. The independent variables in our experiment are the concentration of hydrochloric acid. The dependent variable was the rate of reaction. Use of rate of reaction in industry The chemical industry makes medicine and many other substances such as; Limestone - this is used for building Sulphuric acid — used to make other substances Ammonia - used to make fertilisers.

Conclusion In my investigation, my data and my graphs proved that my hypothesis was correct. For example, when my concentration was 1M the average reaction time was seconds, and then when the concentration was 5M the average reaction time was seconds.

I did have some outliers in my results; however I think that the experiment went fairly well overall. I have calculated the gradient of my line to support my hypothesis and found that: For every one M increase, the rate for reaction increases by 2. I did, however find some outliers in my results. These are circled on my graphs. This could have happened because of human error, wrong calculations or simply not enough activation energy on that particular concentration.

I will discuss these further in my evaluation. Graphs All of the graphs that I drew for this investigation show a negative correlation.

This shows that as you increase the independent variable the concentrationthe other variable the time taken for the experimentwent down. This fits in with my hypothesis and my data. In my scatter graph with line of best fit, most of the points are close to the line. This shows that my data is quite accurate. There are a few mild outliers. The results for 1, 2 and 4M keep showing outliers, gcse chemistry coursework. This could have happened because of calculation errors, human errors, recording errors or a fault with the equipment that we used.

The points in the top right are quite far down so this shows a negative correlation. This good because it shows that for every increase in concentration is a decrease in rate of reaction, gcse chemistry coursework.

This is supportive of my conclusion. My Error bar graph shows a negative correlation. The bars of 1M and 2M overlap and this shows that there is no real difference. The bars for 3M, 4m and 5M do not overlap. This shows that there is a difference in the data which proves accuracy. And supports my conclusion. The size of the error bars is quite small so I think I can say that my data is quite accurate except for the 2M result which is quite a long error bar.

On my ROR graph, there is a positive correlation. There are 2 outliers Improvements and further investigations: If I do a further investigation, I will try to minimise the number of mistakes that I make.

Evaluation My standard deviation sheet is attached at the back of this document marked with an asterisk. I have highlighted the 2M results on my gcse chemistry coursework because it seems as though there is a problem with that set, gcse chemistry coursework. I think this because there is outliers in the 2M set of data and the error bars overlap between 1M and 2M on my error bar graph. As I was using liquids, I had to consider concentration and temperature of the liquids, gcse chemistry coursework.

If I was using solids, I could investigate surface area and for gases I could investigate pressure In concentration I looked at five different concentration of HCl The volume of HCl stayed the same; also the volume of sodium thiosulphate stayed the same, the concentration of sodium thiosulphate stayed the same.

I could have use a colorimeter to identify colour changes in the products. Keep the size of my measuring flask is the same size; this should hopefully make my experiment much fairer and accurate, gcse chemistry coursework. I would do different trials on sulphuric acid and nitric acid. These two acids react well with the right materials. I would also consider using a wider range of concentrations so I can do in-depth analysis and I can compare the two acids.

I think that my method for my investigation is easy to follow. I could test this by asking one of my peers to follow the instructions and then asking for their feedback. This can help me identify any faults. In my investigation, there was the limitation of room temperature. The room temperature could have affected my reaction and this could be the reason that I have some outliers.

 

GCSE Coursework

 

gcse chemistry coursework

 

Coursework Downloads Links Revision Tips: GCSE Coursework Writing your coursework (now often called "controlled assessment") is clearly a big task. It's also amazingly worthwhile. Think how much time you spend in lessons, and what coursework is worth in comparison! Science. Get unique and highly acclaimed help with science coursework for the. GCSE Chemistry is part of our science suite, developed with teachers to inspire and challenge students of all abilities and aspirations. The content starts with fundamental aspects of chemistry such as atomic structure, bonding and the properties of matter, and builds to topics in which the fundamentals are applied such as quantitative chemistry and equilibria. Chemistry is about everything you've ever touched, eaten, drunk or breathed; every gas, liquid and solid in the universe. It gives you the opportunity to understand the chemical properties of the building blocks of life and the universe. Amongst other things you'll be studying the periodic table, reactions, carbon compounds, atoms and basqupiats.gqs: